Study confirms high doses of vitamin D have no effect on COVID-19

Study confirms high doses of vitamin D have no effect on COVID-19


Written by Robby Berman on May 4, 2021 — Fact checked by Catherine Carver, MPH
Share on PinterestThe role of vitamin D in COVID-19 has been of much discussion. Gennaro Leonardi/EyeEm/Getty Images

  • Researchers have wondered whether vitamin D may help people avoid SARS-CoV-2 infections and mitigate the effects of COVID-19.
  • A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial seeks to test vitamin D’s usefulness in combatting the disease.
  • The study finds high doses of vitamin D have no effect on key COVID-19 outcomes in particularly ill hospitalized patients.
  • Further research is needed to investigate whether a deficiency of vitamin D is associated with more severe cases of COVID-19.

There have been numerous investigations into a possible role for vitamin D in preventing both SARS-CoV-2 infections and COVID-19 complications.

These studies have drawn conflicting conclusions. Now, a study from researchers in Brazil provides a more robust answer to at least one key question: can vitamin D help prevent COVID-19 complications in particularly ill hospitalized patients? According to the results, the answer appears to be no.

The study found that high doses of vitamin D administered to hospital patients with moderate or severe COVID-19 did not affect the course of the disease.

“In vitro studies or trials with animals had previously shown that in certain situations, vitamin D and its metabolites could have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects, as well as modulating the immune response,” explains Rosa Pereira, principal investigator for the study.

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“We decided to investigate whether a high dose of the substance could have a protective effect in the context of an acute viral infection, reducing either the inflammation or the viral load.”

Based on the study’s results, says Pereira, “So far, we can say there’s no indication to administer vitamin D to patients who come to the hospital with severe COVID-19.”

The research appears in JAMA.

COVID-19 and vitamin D

Scientists at the University of São Paulo’s Medical School (FM-USP) in São Paulo, Brazil, conducted the randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled clinical trial. The researchers say this study is the first of its kind.

The team tracked the experiences of 240 volunteers receiving treatment for COVID-19 symptoms at FM-USP’s Hospital das Clínicas and the Ibirapuera Park field hospital in São Paulo City, from June to August 2020. All participants had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 using a polymerase chain reaction test or via antibody testing.

All of them received treatment with standard COVID-19 protocols that include antibiotic and anti-inflammatory medications. The researchers then divided them into two equal groups at random.

The scientists gave participants in the first group a single 200,000-unit dose of vitamin D3 dissolved in peanut oil. They gave those in the second group unaltered peanut-oil placebos.

The design of the study was to discover whether a high dose of vitamin D was associated with a shorter hospitalization — the researchers found that it was not.

The investigation also found no evidence that vitamin D made a person less likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit or less likely to need intubation.

Vitamin D also seemed to have no effect on mortality, although Pereira cautions that a larger study with more participants is required before researchers can draw final conclusions.

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